iwatch

This is the final post of a three part series on why the Apple Watch revealed earlier this week wouldn’t have been the one Steve Jobs made. Jobs would disapprove two buttons on the Apple Watch and he certainly would have made the software beautiful and cohesive.

Fortunately, it’s not all negative. Tim Cook and Jony Ive did do something right that Jobs probably wouldn’t have done: the seemingly endless amount of customization possible for the Apple Watch.

In this case, going against a Jobsian philosophy is a good thing.

Read Full Article

This is the second post in a three part series on what Steve Jobs would have done differently with the Apple Watch. Yesterday, we talked about why he wouldn’t have designed two buttons for it. The digital crown is smart, but Jobs would have eliminated the personal messaging button.

He would have more to disagree with Tim Cook and Jony Ive unfortunately. As I sat through the keynote and various demos for the Apple Watch, I found myself with an unfamiliar feeling regarding Apple’s mobile products: confusion.

I was confused by Apple Watch’s software, and I know why. There’s no consistent design language. Also, it’s kinda ugly.

This would’ve never happened under Steve’s watch.

Read Full Article

This is the first post in a three part series about the Apple Watch, and why Steve Jobs would have done it differently.

The Apple Watch is something I’ve been anticipating — Apple is the undisputed opinion leader of the gadget industry and their entry legitimizes this nascent category. So I want to give it proper time and context, even if the first smartwatch I buy will probably be the Moto 360.

And yes, I do believe this is not the watch Steve Jobs would have designed – that’s not necessarily a bad thing. I’ll begin with something neutral Steve Jobs would have disapproved for his Apple Watch: two buttons.

The digital crown is smart. But the personal messaging button is not.

Read Full Article

In just 24 hours, Apple will hold their much anticipated event in which they are expected to announce the iPhone 6 and iWatch. I’ll be right there watching the live stream and will post about it. It’s going to be an exciting day. I’m excited.

But.

What I don’t get is the endless amount of coverage and last minute speculation. And from respected publications too. Going by just a selection of Techmeme headlines the past 48 hours:

“iPhone and ‘iWatch’ NFC payments to use tokenization technology, preferred by banks for its security benefits.”

“5.5-inch iPhone 6 may run landscape apps with more productive iPad-like interface.”

“What to expect from Apple’s September 9th event: new iPhones, wearables, iOS8, more.”

“Apple’s wearable will come with an App store; Facebook and several other big developers already have access to a pre-release SDK.”

May run. Sources say this. What to expect. Yadda yadda.

Really guys??

Read Full Article

I was getting worried, but it seems like smartwatches are taking off after all. Research company Canalys estimated 6 million smartwatches and fitness trackers were sold in the first half of 2014, or a 684% increase compared to the previous period.

This doesn’t even take into account Android Wear devices, which will start to get counted in next quarter’s report.

And the best is yet to come. The Moto 360 was widely considered superior to the two Android Wear watches already on the market. Motorola will launch the device next month after its event on September 4.

Read Full Article

You’re the most valuable technology company in the world.  What do you do?

  1. Launch a fashion accessory
  2. Extend from your core competency to a new, adjacent category
  3. Neither

How many raised their hands for 1?  Yet, that’s what a lot of smart people seem to be advocating for Apple and the iWatch.  Anthony Kosner of Forbes is the latest to sing this chorus.

How do you convince the mass of consumers to consider an iWatch to be a necessary accessory for 21st century life? Make it a fashion-forward, celebrity-endorsed object of desire. Make it aspirational (to use the technical marketing term.) And then, once its value and exclusivity is established, transform it into an “attainable luxury,” much like the iPhone has become. From this perspective, Apple’s fashion executives have a lot to do. To start with Pruniaux, perhaps Apple now intends to sell the iWatch through the same retail channels as luxury watches like TAG Heuer—Tourneau and high-end department stores.

Hmm.  I don’t think anyone will deny that brand is a big part of Apple’s success; Apple products are desirable and aspirational.  However, while fashion is always a differentiating factor for Apple, it’s never been the point.

Read Full Article

Thurrott is reporting at Winsupersite that Microsoft is readying it’s wearable device. It’s allegedly more fitness tracker like the Samsung Gear Fit than smartwatch, and the big news is that it’ll work with iOS, Android and of course Windows Phone.

This doesn’t leave me excited for Microsoft, however. The Redmond company wisely pulled its Surface mini product because the device didn’t do much beyond the competition; and of course, we don’t have the full picture yet, but based on Thurrott’s report it doesn’t look like Microsoft’s fitness tracker will be anything special either.

My sources tell me instead that Microsoft will this fall release a Samsung Gear Fit-like fitness band that will display smart phone-based notifications, just like the current and rumored watches and other wearables. So that’s the first bit of rumor busting: It’s a wristband, not a watch. . .The focus, however, is the same as with Samsung Gear and similar fitness bands: Using multiple sensors, it will track your fitness—steps, calories burned, heart rate, and the like—throughout the day and interoperate with apps on mobile phones.

So, it’ll be like the Samsung Gear Fit, which has yet to take the market by a storm after selling a paltry 250,000 units despite huge advertising. (By comparison, Microsoft’s much criticized Surface line sold about 750,000 units the last three months.)

Read Full Article

A few days ago at the Code Conference, Apple’s Internet Software and Services chief Eddy Cue proclaimed that “Later this year, we’ve got the best product pipeline that I’ve seen in my 25 years at Apple.”  And he said it without hyperbole.

What a bold statement.  Those 25 years would include industry-shifting products like the iPod, iPhone, iPad and MacBook Air.

There’s two ways to interpret that statement.  The first is that Eddy was being literal — they are going to release better but really just incremental updates to existing products.  Technically, the newest versions could be the best products Apple has ever made.

But we’re all thinking the second — that there will be at least one new industry-shifting product announced by the end of this year.

Read Full Article