google glass

There’s a fascinating article on Reuters on the state of Google Glass — in summary, that entrepreneurs, companies and investors are abandoning the platform because there is no market yet. I read it with mixed feelings.

In my entrepreneurship class at Stanford, my lecturer Andy Rachleff pointed out that being first to market is not a demonstrative advantage — rather, it’s first to product-market fit that’s critical. Google was not the first in search, but the first with the right search product. Once it built its lead, it was impossible for competitors to catch up.

So when Google opened up its Google Glass program, why did so many developers flock to it? I can’t recall a unicorn-level company ever winning because it was first to a technology platform. In mobile, Instagram and even Whatsapp had many predecessors. Uber was not invented at the start of mobile’s lifecycle; only later. I can’t think of a company that succeeded because it was simply there earlier than others.

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Who says Google Glass are only for glassholes? It might save your life one day.

Stanford Medical School conducted an experiment recently where two groups of Stanford residents were tasked to operate on dummies, only to be faced with unexpected complications. The group wearing Google Glass did better; they kept more focus on the patient because they didn’t have to look away to check vitals.

As one doctor who’ve experimented with using Google Glass in surgery said:

Being able to see your laparoscopic images when you’re operating face to face instead of looking across the room at a projection screen is just mind-bogglingly fantastic.

Using Glass in the operating room has other benefits, like enabling students and other doctors to log-in and learn. The operating doctor can also use it to consult with colleagues on thorny complications during a procedure.

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